Nov
25
2005

Thanksgiving in the Jeub Home

Thanksgiving is a regular tradition in the Jeub home. As most people would have it, our traditions involve mainly food, family and fellowship. First, there are the standards: turkey, cranberry sauce and yams. We also enjoy our own family traditions, inherited from Dad’s great-great Grandfather, from Germany; which include the sweet and sour green beans, and plenty of homemade rolls and potatoes. But the best part comes before the big dinner: the h’orderves. With plenty of black olives (one for each finger), shrimp with cocktail sauce, stuffed eggs, stuffed celery, Dad’s cheese ball with crackers, cheese and summer sausage on crackers. Not to mention the pie. At the end of the evening we enjoyed 6 different types of pie: Apple, cherry, pumpkin, pecan, chocolate cream, and key-lime.

God has really blessed us this year. Besides the h’orderves, main meal and pie, He has blessed us with a much deeper blessing: friends and family. Every year, we enjoy fellowship with friends and family by visiting a good friends’ house, or inviting a good friend over. This year, the Otto’s joined us for our yearly traditions. The Otto children brought games of their own, and it was a regular holiday complete. After h’orderves and a walk down to the creek, we enjoyed a bountiful Thanksgiving dinner. But to make it 110%, our home school group got together to make us the thanksgiving dinner. Eight different families made side dishes, and Mrs. Byrnes made the turkey. Provision is the only word for it. When Dad had decided not to go elk hunting this year because hunting season was so near Mom’s due date, we worried that we might not have a enough to eat through the winter. We should not have worried. I am reminded again and again of the bible verse that says “Even the birds never go hungry, and they don’t need clothing. How much more important are you than the birds?” two days ago, a friend stopped by to drop off four large turkeys for our freezer, and friends have been dropping off pre-cooked meals often enough that I may not need to cook from scratch for a long time yet.

Last week at church, our pastor gave the message: do you worship your food, clothing, house, or even your children? These are good things to be thankful for, but we need to know what is under the icing. God and salvation are the cake, the best part, the nutritious part. Our family, friends, food, houses, animals, property, are just the icing on the cake. How loving our God is to frost this cake so generously! This above all, is what we are to be thankful for: for the God, the baker, as we enjoy in his many blessings.